Tuesday, October 23, 2012

OSHA Sample Daily Checklists

Sample Daily Checklists for Powered Industrial Trucks


The following checklists are intended to assist in providing training on OSHA's powered industrial truck operator standards. They are not a substitute for any of the provisions of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 or for any standards issued by the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). OSHA wishes to acknowledge that this checklist and related graphics was developed in cooperation with the Industrial Truck Association as part of the OSHA-ITA Alliance.

The OSHA standard for powered industrial truck training [29 CFR 1910.178(l)] requires that an employer provide training to truck operators on a variety of topics. Among these topics are vehicle inspection and maintenance that the operator will be required to perform. The following checklists are being provided as part of OSHA's ongoing effort to assist employers and employees in ensuring that a safe and healthful workplace is provided. The lists serve as a guide only and may not be totally inclusive. Each type of powered industrial truck is unique and checklists pertinent to each type of vehicle should be modified accordingly. It is recommended that the manufacturer's instructions on vehicle maintenance and owner's and operator's responsibilities also be consulted. The OSHA standards for powered industrial trucks must be reviewed to ensure compliance.

There are two general types of powered industrial trucks: electric (battery) powered and internal combustion engine (gas/LPG/diesel) powered. Each of these general types has a variety of different configurations and attachments. Your workplace may have a variety of trucks that are being operated. ALL OPERATORS MUST BE TRAINED TO OPERATE ALL TYPE OF INDUSTRIAL TRUCKS THEY WILL BE OPERATING. 

Daily, pre-shift inspection of powered industrial trucks is required by OSHA standards.

Depicted below are the major types of industrial trucks and some of the most common variations. The drawings of the trucks depicted below are intended to represent the typical configuration of trucks for each type. They do not include all available options, attachments or configurations.


Electric Motor Powered Industrial Trucks
Standup End Control Rider
Standup End Control Rider
Sitdown Rider
Sitdown Rider
Narrow Aisle Reach
Narrow Aisle Reach
Narrow Aisle High Lift Straddle
Narrow Aisle High Lift Straddle
Narrow Aisle Order Picker
Narrow Aisle Order Picker
Narrow Aisle Sideloader Platform
Narrow Aisle Sideloader Platform
Narrow Aisle Sideloader High Lift Pallet
Narrow Aisle Sideloader High Lift Pallet
Narrow Aisle Turret
Narrow Aisle Turret
Narrow Aisle Low Lift Platform
Narrow Aisle Low Lift Platform
Stacker Pallet
Stacker Pallet
Walkie Platform Low Lift
Walkie Platform Low Lift
Walkie Pallet Low Lift
Walkie Pallet Low Lift
Tractor Walkie/Rider
Tractor Walkie/Rider
Walkie Pallet High Lift
Walkie Pallet High Lift
 



Internal Combustion Engine Powered Industrial Trucks - Gas/LPG/Diesel
Counterbalanced Forklift Gas/LPG Cushion Tire
Counterbalanced Forklift Gas/LPG Cushion Tire
Counterbalanced Forklift Gas/LPG/Diesel Pneumatic Tire
Counterbalanced Forklift Gas/LPG/Diesel Pneumatic Tire
Tow Tractor Gas/LPG/Diesel
Tow Tractor Gas/LPG/Diesel
Rough Terrain Forklift Gas/LPG/Diesel Vertical Mast
Rough Terrain Forklift Gas/LPG/Diesel Vertical Mast


Daily checklists for each type of industrial truck are available from the truck manufacturer. You may choose to use a checklist for each type of industrial truck in your workplace or compile one that can be used for any type of truck.

Refer to the owner's manual, specifications and manufacturer's recommendations to modify the checklist for trucks being operated in your workplace. Below are sample checklists for internal combustion and electric trucks. These lists can be modified to suit your workplace needs.


Operator's Daily Checklist - Internal Combustion Engine Industrial Truck - Gas/LPG/Diesel Truck

Record of Fuel Added

Date   Operator   Fuel  
Truck#   Model#   Engine Oil  
Department   Serial#   Radiator Coolant  
Shift   Hour Meter   Hydraulic Oil  


SAFETY AND OPERATIONAL CHECKS (PRIOR TO EACH SHIFT)

Have a qualified mechanic correct all problems.

Engine Off Checks OK Maintenance
Leaks – Fuel, Hydraulic Oil, Engine Oil or Radiator Coolant    
Tires – Condition and Pressure    
Forks, Top Clip Retaining Pin and Heel – Check Condition    
Load Backrest – Securely Attached    
Hydraulic Hoses, Mast Chains, Cables and Stops – Check Visually    
Overhead Guard – Attached    
Finger Guards – Attached    
Propane Tank (LP Gas Truck) – Rust Corrosion, Damage    
Safety Warnings – Attached (Refer to Parts Manual for Location)    
Battery – Check Water/Electrolyte Level and Charge    
All Engine Belts – Check Visually    
Hydraulic Fluid Level – Check Level    
Engine Oil Level – Dipstick    
Transmission Fluid Level – Dipstick    
Engine Air Cleaner – Squeeze Rubber Dirt Trap or Check the Restriction Alarm (if equipped)    
Fuel Sedimentor (Diesel)    
Radiator Coolant – Check Level    
Operator's Manual – In Container    
Nameplate – Attached and Information Matches Model, Serial Number and Attachments    
Seat Belt – Functioning Smoothly    
Hood Latch – Adjusted and Securely Fastened    
Brake Fluid – Check Level    
Engine On Checks – Unusual Noises Must Be Investigated Immediately OK Maintenance
Accelerator or Direction Control Pedal – Functioning Smoothly    
Service Brake – Functioning Smoothly    
Parking Brake – Functioning Smoothly    
Steering Operation – Functioning Smoothly    
Drive Control – Forward/Reverse – Functioning Smoothly    
Tilt Control – Forward and Back – Functioning Smoothly    
Hoist and Lowering Control – Functioning Smoothly    
Attachment Control – Operation    
Horn and Lights – Functioning    
Cab (if equipped) – Heater, Defroster, Wipers – Functioning    
Gauges: Ammeter, Engine Oil Pressure, Hour Meter, Fuel Level, Temperature, Instrument Monitors – Functioning    


Operator's Daily Checklist - Electric Industrial Truck

Record of Fluid Added

Date   Operator   Battery Water  
Truck#   Model#   Hydraulic Oil  
Department   Serial#      
Shift   Drive Hour Meter Reading   Hoist Hour Meter Reading  


SAFETY AND OPERATIONAL CHECKS (PRIOR TO EACH SHIFT)

Have a qualified mechanic correct all problems.

Motor Off Checks OK Maintenance
Leaks – Hydraulic Oil, Battery    
Tires – Condition and Pressure    
Forks, Top Clip Retaining Pin and Heel -- Condition    
Load Backrest Extension – Attached    
Hydraulic Hoses, Mast Chains, Cables & Stops – Check Visually    
Finger Guards – Attached    
Overhead Guard – Attached    
Safety Warnings – Attached (Refer to Parts Manual for Location)    
Battery – Water/Electrolyte Level and Charge    
Hydraulic Fluid Level – Dipstick    
Transmission Fluid Level – Dipstick    
Operator's Manual in Container    
Capacity Plate Attached – Information Matches Model, Serial Number and Attachments    
Battery Restraint System – Adjust and Fasten    
Operator Protection
Sitdown Truck - Seat Belt – Functioning Smoothly
Man-up Truck – Fall protection/Restraining means - Functioning
   
Brake Fluid – Check level    
Motor On Checks (Unusual Noises Must Be Investigated Immediately) OK Maintenance
Accelerator Linkage – Functioning Smoothly    
Parking Brake – Functioning Smoothly    
Service Brake – Functioning Smoothly    
Steering Operation – Functioning Smoothly    
Drive Control – Forward/Reverse – Functioning Smoothly    
Tilt Control – Forward and Back – Functioning Smoothly    
Hoist and Lowering Control – Functioning Smoothly    
Attachment Control – Operation    
Horn – Functioning    
Lights & Alarms (where present) – Functioning    
Hour Meter – Functioning    
Battery Discharge Indicator – Functioning    
Instrument Monitors – Functioning    
ALL OPERATORS MUST BE TRAINED AND EVALUATED ON THE TYPES OF INDUSTRIAL TRUCKS AND ATTACHMENTS THEY WILL BE OPERATING.

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Forklift equipped with a forklift boom considered a crane?

June 21, 2012

The Honorable Jeff Miller
Pensacola, FL 32503

Dear Congressman Miller:

Thank you for your correspondence to the Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regarding the use of forklifts for construction activities.  I appreciate the opportunity to respond to you and your constituents.

In your inquiry, you forward a copy of an ASK OSHA e-correspondence submitted to OSHA on November 4, 2011, from your constituent Mr. Keith Raffield.  I appreciate your patience, as the process for achieving resolution to very complex compliance issues can be lengthy. Among several other major issues in the construction industry, OSHA has been in the process of responding to many interpretative inquiries such as this one regarding the scope and application of our final rule for Cranes and Derricks in Construction.

In his inquiry, Mr. Raffield asks OSHA the following question:

Can I, as a forklift (not a crane operator) operator, use a designated forklift boom that has a hook on it as long as it meets the load requirements?

OSHA's response to Mr. Raffield's inquiry depends upon not only the original design of the forklift that is used, but also the design of the boom attachment and how the forklift and boom are operated together to move the load.  We recognize that our ASK OSHA webpage was not designed to provide for the submission of attachments with inquiries from the public, therefore the picture and description of the forklift in question that was provided with your inquiry was very helpful for making this determination.

Equipment that is designed to function as both a crane and a forklift would be considered multi-purpose equipment and covered by the crane standard when configured, and operated as, a crane.  However, Mr. Raffield submitted a picture of, and information about, a typical vertical mast forklift with a variable length boom attachment that uses slings or a rope to hoist and move a suspended load. This type of forklift described was designed by the manufacturer to lift palletized loads or those that can be safely handled and supported by the forks of the equipment.  The described configuration of a forklift, unlike a crane or derrick, can only provide powered horizontal and vertical movement of the suspended load by both driving the forklift horizontally in addition to moving its mast and forks.  Although the described boom attachment extends the reach of the forks, it was not designed to provide powered horizontal and vertical movement of the load.  This forklift configured with the described boom attachment is not covered by the cranes standard.

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Skid-Steer Loader Operations Training

November 5, 2004

Mr. Mark Fair
Bobcat Enterprises

Re: Powered Industrial Truck Training applicable to construction: §§1910.178 and 1926.602(a) and (d).

Dear Mr. Fair:

This is in response to your fax of June 30, 2004, to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). We have paraphrased your questions as follows:

Question (1): Are the training requirements in §1910.178(l) applicable to skid-steer loaders used for earthmoving in construction? If not, what training requirements apply?

Answer: Title 29 CFR 1926.602(d) states:

Powered industrial truck operator training. NOTE: The requirements applicable to construction work under this paragraph are identical to those set forth at §1910.178(l) of this chapter.
Under §1926.602(d), employees engaged in construction who use equipment covered by 29 CFR Part 1926 Subpart O and the Powered Industrial Truck Standard (29 CFR 1910.178) must be trained in accordance with the requirements in §1910.178(l). However, §1910.178(a) states that the Powered Industrial Truck Standard does not apply "to vehicles intended primarily for earth moving...." Since skid-steer loaders are "intended primarily for earth moving," the training requirements in §1910.178(l) do not apply.1

However, 29 CFR 1926.21(b)(2) states:
The employer shall instruct each employee in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions and the regulations applicable to his [or her] work environment to control or eliminate any hazards or other exposure to illness or injury.
Therefore, under §1926.21(b)(2), the employer is required to train the skid steer operators so that they can recognize and avoid unsafe conditions. As a practical matter, such training needs to be comprehensive enough to ensure that the operator is fully capable of safely handling the equipment in the type of conditions he/she will encounter at the site. The amount of training necessary to fulfill the requirement may be reduced based on the extent to which the operator has acquired the necessary knowledge and skill from prior experience (see the answer to Question 2, below).

Question (2): Section 1926.20(b)(4) provides that only those who are qualified through training or "experience" are allowed to operate equipment. In this context, what does "experienced" mean? If a worker has operated the equipment a number of times in the past, does that automatically mean they are "experienced" for purposes of this requirement?

Answer: No. Title 29 CFR 1926.20(b)(4) states:
The employer shall permit only those employees qualified by training or experience to operate equipment or machinery. [Emphasis added.]
The term "experience" in this provision is used in conjunction with the term "qualified." Where an operator, through prior experience, has acquired the knowledge and skill necessary to safely operate the equipment, the operator may be considered "qualified by...experience" for purposes of this provision. However, a history of having operated the equipment by itself does not necessarily mean that the operator knows how to safely and competently operate the equipment. The provision requires the operator to be "qualified." If the worker has operated the machinery in the past but has not acquired the knowledge and skills necessary to safely operate the equipment, the experience is not sufficient to make the employee "qualified."